Frith Street Gallery

Golden Square

17-18 Golden Square, London W1F 9JJ
T +44 (0)20 7494 1550 ~ F +44 (0)20 7287 3733

Image of: Housegod Shrine
  • Fiona Tan
  • Housegod Shrine, 2010
  • Photograph. Colour pigment print on archival paper
  • 29 x 19.4 cm
  • Edition of 6 + 1AP
  • Enlarge
  • Image of: Cloud Island
  • Image of: Cloud Island
  • Image of: Cloud Island
  • Image of: Projection
  • Image of: Empty House (Clock)
  • Image of: Empty House (Telephone)
  • Image of: Housegod Shrine

Fiona Tan: Cloud Island and other new works

17 September 2010 – 29 October 2010

Frith Street Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new video and photographic works by Fiona Tan.

The 45 minute film Cloud Island (2010) depicts the small island of Inujima which is located in Japan’s Seto Inland Sea. Inujima is in many ways exemplary of Japan’s last 400 years of industrialization. Once an island of fishermen and farmers, Inujima then became a place of granite quarries and copper refineries. Now all the works stand empty; the quarries filled with water, factory chimneys crumbling. The island’s aged population has dwindled to around fifty people who continue their day-to-day lives in this evocative and rather neglected place where clipped trees and well tended allotments stand next to abandoned homes

Fiona Tan filmed Inujima in May 2010 just as the first phase of a project commissioned by the Naoshima Fukutake Art Museum was being completed. The architect Kazuyo Seijma has been commissioned by the museum to create 10 pavilions for the exhibition of artworks on the island. So this is a moment of transition for Inujima and from time to time one glimpses the building works or one of the startling new structures whose shiny contemporaneity seems somehow at odds with its surroundings. But in Tan’s film this sense of change is felt almost more than it is seen. Cloud Island is a slow, quiet work. A film which is in many ways about waiting.

Projection is a simple and somewhat ironic portrait of the artist. Tan filmed herself in her studio, projected the moving image onto a bed sheet and then re-filmed this set up. The portrait on the fluttering sheet is diffused and continually disturbed and when projected life size onto a free-floating screen in the gallery space the result seems like an optical illusion and rather ghost like.