Frith Street Gallery

Golden Square

17-18 Golden Square, London W1F 9JJ
T +44 (0)20 7494 1550 ~ F +44 (0)20 7287 3733

  • Eyes on the prize: the must-see art and design of autumn 2016 ~ Adrian Searle, Jonathan Jones , Sean O'Hagan and Oliver Wainwright

    Published in The Guardian, August 2016

    Daphne Wright: Emotional Archaeology at National Trust, Tyntesfield, Somerset and Arnolfini, Bristol; Tacita Dean: LA Exuberance at Frith Street Gallery, Golden Square; Neon: The Charged Line at Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool featuring work by Fiona Banner.

    https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/aug/29/eyes-on-the-prize-the-must-see-art-and-design-of-autumn-2016

    Related Exhibitions: Tacita Dean: LA Exuberance

  • The Wright Stuff: Daphne Wright ~ Brian McAvera

    Published in Irish Arts Review, November 2015 ( December 2015 - February 2016 (Vol 32 No 4) p. 526-533 )

    I am dyslexic like a high percentage of creative people - that can have a big impact on a personality. I knew I wanted to be an artist. I don’t know how, but I went to Sligo thinking that I’d learn how to demonstrate emotions through art but that idea was soon squished. We learned every single process - carving, clay, and metalworking ... By the time I had finished I was ready for the challenges. We were minded, valued and nurtured. It was communal almost. Competition didn’t exist. We were proud of each other’s ability.

  • Daphne Wright: A Small Thing to Ask ~ Laura Cumming

    Published in The Guardian, 16 March 2014

    A boy the size of life – and eerily lifelike – sits on the top of a kitchen table. Legs crossed, head drooping, hunched, he doesn’t know what to do with his growing self. His seated brother is making the same point more dramatically, slumped right over the table, arms sprawled, extravagantly listless, hungry or tired. They look as if they are waiting to be fed.

    To be fed, or to be nourished in some deeper sense: that is the question, the crux of the Irish artist Daphne Wright’s double sculpture. Two lads hanging about the kitchen, getting in the way, who can’t think of anything better to do: the poses are humorous, proverbial, familiar to any parent, and poignant to anyone who remembers the dreamy dwalms of childhood.

    Yet these children who have the vestiges of life so powerfully about them are deathly pale and still, as if fading out. Perhaps they could still be revived – that is in the drooping poses, and the kitchen-table scenario – or perhaps they are gone already, absent in more than their dreams. Petrified in cold matter, the colour of chalk, they are here and not here: lost boys, immovable ghosts.

    http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/mar/16/daphne-wright-frith-camille-henrot-chisenhale-review

    Related Exhibitions: Daphne Wright: A Small Thing to Ask

  • A CONVERSATION WITH DAPHNE WRIGHT ~ Robert Preece

    Published in Sculpture Magazine , March 2010

    Daphne Wright’s work maneuvers things into what her biographical statement calls “Well-wrought but delicate doubt.’ Shifting between ‘taughtness and mess,’ it sets ‘imagery, materials, and language in constant metaphorical motion.’ Using a wide range of materials and techniques-plaster, video, printmaking, found objects, and performance-she creates beautiful and rather eerie worlds that feel like the threshold to somewhere new.

    http://www.sculpture.org/documents/scmag10/mar_10/wri/wri.shtml

  • Daphne Wright the body and its death cast ~ Laura Mansfield

    Published in Circa, Spring 2008

Page  1 2 3 >  Last ›